Emacs For Mac Os X

 
Emacs For Mac Os X

Tested on OS X 10.11 El Capitan, with Homebrew Emacs and Spacemacs config. Why Emacs Daemon, why this post. Installing Emacs on a Mac in and of itself is not that much of a problem - there are several options, ranging from Homebrew and Macports to Emacs for Mac OS X, Emacs Mac Port and Aquamacs. The last two in this list have some OS X. Relatively new to OS X, runnning mac-emacs 21.1 on OS X 10.1.5, I seem to have lost my latin 1 glyphs. Tried everything. Mule stuff like set-input-method seems to work ok, but I get blank boxes instead of accented glyphs. Today I also noticed on a Mozilla 1.0 that some latin 1 glyphs were not displaying, so maybe this is an OS X. Download Emacs distribution for Mac OS X (Carbon) for free. This project delivers a binary distribution of GNU Emacs for Mac OS X (Carbon).

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In a previous post I mentioned that I upgraded my homebrew install of Emacs after Emacs 26.2 was released, and noticed that I had lost its GUI functionality. That’s a pretty serious restriction for me as I usually end up with multiple frames across my desktop. I did end up installing the homebrew Emacs for Mac tap which restored the GUI functionality. It had have one niggling problem for me, though. My muscle memory says that I use Shift-Meta-7 (aka Meta-/ ) for keyword expansion as I use a German keyboard layout most of the time. Unfortunately, with Meta mapped to the Apple Command key, Shift-Meta-7 is a menu shortcut. Instead of expanding keywords, I kept opening menus. That clearly wouldn’t do.

Malcolm Purvis had been kind enough to point out in a comment to my original homebrew Emacs post that Davide Restivo had created a brew tap that brings the necessary –with-cocoa build option back. He just upgraded it to Emacs 26.2, so this morning I rebuild my Emacs on OSX again and ended up where I wanted to be, with the latest version of Emacs, keyword expansion as I expected it to work, and a working GUI. Thanks, Davide!

And yes, it might come across as silly to rebuilding the editor just to get my preferred key combination back. It probably is – after all, I could’ve just remapped the key combination in my .emacs. I tend to run Emacs across a myriad of platforms (Linux, OSX, Windows, FreeBSD to just list a few) and having a “stock” Emacs experience on all of these platforms means that my .emacs has only a minimal amount of OS-based conditionals in it. For example, it has the following OS X specific combo:

Mac

Emacs Mac Os X Curly Brackets

In fact, the above block is the only OS-specific configuration in my whole .emacs file. I’d like to keep it that way.

Emacs For Mac Os X

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